Defect Concerns and Manufacturing Liability Insurance

Things are much different in today’s business world than they were in the past. There was a time when people bought products for everyday living and they were generally satisfied with the results. Now there is a vast array of products to choose from, all from different companies competing for the same consumers, and many of these products come under some tough scrutiny. Therefore, businesses need to know how to be properly protected in the event of unforeseen circumstances that could result in claims due to injuries, or simply misconception about the intended use of the product.

Product liability is a very serious matter. Most products are examined and tested long before they go to market, but we still see defective products in stores all the time. A simple defect may not be a big deal, but one that causes public health concerns, or could lead to serious injuries occurring are a real issue. For manufacturers such as yourself, manufacturing liability insurance is your safeguard against claims that you may have accidentally put an unsafe product into the hands of consumers.

Consider every aspect of the product

A couple of basic questions you might want to ask yourself when preparing a new product to go to market: When you think of this product, do you think of all the implications that can arise from its use? Is your primary focus solely on getting the product into the hands of the consumer? You really must focus on areas of safety and dependability as much, if not more, than just on advertising to keep your brand name in the minds of the public if you truly want to be successful.

With all of your years of experience in the industry you have probably come to realize that you’re just quite vulnerable to mishaps and things that are out of your control, any of which could result in property damage or injuries arising from the use of your products. That is why you need to focus on protecting your employees, your business, and your assets by obtaining adequate amounts of manufacturing liability insurance. Speak to an agent about any questions or concerns you have related to insurance.

 

 

 

 

Daniels Insurance and Construction Crime

The construction business is fraught with issues stemming from theft and crimes like vandalism. These can slow down the progress of the project and this adds up to costly delays. As a contractor you realize that could be the difference between making a profit and sustaining a loss. Your ability to control theft and vandalism on the site are vital to the success of the job. Unfortunately you can’t be everywhere, and when the site closes down for the night is when your equipment is most vulnerable.

When losses occur due to crime or theft, you’ll need the protection of a construction policy tailored to meet this specific coverage need, and Daniels Insurance can provide the type of policy that you need. In the meantime, these suggestions on efforts to control job site security and assistance in identifying major sources of crime losses should be of some help. You should focus on implementing these measures for controlling such losses.

 

Establish some general safety guidelines

You can start by creating and posting a written security policy. Then, develop a job-site security plan, assign supervisory security responsibilities and encourage security awareness among all workers. Require prompt reporting by workers of any incidents of theft and vandalism that occur and launch an investigation immediately. Report all losses to the police immediately, and maintain complete records of all security incidents.

 

On-site security measures are extremely helpful

Make sure that you provide limited access to the site at all times, preferably with gates secured by locks. Check the site out at the end of each day before securing it, and whenever possible, enclose the job site with a security fence and make sure that there is nighttime lighting on the site. It’s also a good idea to post warning signs to keep out unauthorized persons. If feasible, hire security guards and have them patrol the site on designated rounds.

 

Secure all tools, materials and equipment

You might also want to establish a program for verifying all deliveries. Consider utilizing a secured area within the site for equipment storage and maintain an inventory control system for all equipment, tools, and materials. Mark all tools and equipment to allow for easy identification. While this should greatly help reduce theft and crime, when items do go missing, Daniels insurance for contractors and construction companies can help cover the replacement costs.

Examples of Construction Manager at Risk

A Construction Manager (CM) project delivery system is based upon an owner’s agreement with a qualified construction firm to provide construction leadership and perform administration of the project as well as management within a defined scope of services. The construction management project delivery system is further refined by the amount of risk the CM assumes in performance of those services.

It takes a collaborative effort by the owner, architect and construction team to bring a project to a successful completion. This is the key to achieving the desired result for every construction project since each situation is unique unto itself. Projects often fail because of a lack of communication between the governing bodies, which brings up the subject of coverage for a construction manager at risk. The CM will often take the blame when a project undergoes lengthy delays.

The architect and the owner can also be responsible, due to poor planning or lacking the necessary funds to complete a project in a timely manner. When such issues present themselves, a good line of communication can often be a remedy to what might otherwise become a volatile situation. No one want to be considered at fault when they in fact had no control over certain events, but this often happens when one hand doesn’t know what the other hand is doing.

How conflicts expose flaws in the management process

When conflict between the owner versus either the contractor or architect exists, this is the type of situation that can ultimately affect project delivery. The alternative is construction manager at risk (CMR), a delivery method that is designed to align designer and builder to collaboratively serve the owner’s best interests.

With construction manager at risk, a contractor is under contract by the owner during the entire design process to assist in pre-construction project management services and then also to act as a general contractor during the construction process. The architect is on a separate, parallel contract with the owner, making sure that the product fits within any predetermined specifications.

In summary, the contractor is responsible for the execution and control of the work and subcontractors are bound by subcontracts to them. Examples of construction manager at risk would include performance and financial stability of subcontractors and vendors, fluctuations in material prices, schedule adherence, weather, construction means and materials, quality and other non-reimbursable general contractor delays. For questions and concerns, speak to an agent familiar with the inner workings of the construction industry.

Examples of Construction Manager at Risk

A Construction Manager (CM) project delivery system is based upon an owner’s agreement with a qualified construction firm to provide construction leadership and perform administration of the project as well as management within a defined scope of services. The construction management project delivery system is further refined by the amount of risk the CM assumes in performance of those services.

It takes a collaborative effort by the owner, architect and construction team to bring a project to a successful completion. This is the key to achieving the desired result for every construction project since each situation is unique unto itself. Projects often fail because of a lack of communication between the governing bodies, which brings up the subject of coverage for a construction manager at risk. The CM will often take the blame when a project undergoes lengthy delays.

The architect and the owner can also be responsible, due to poor planning or lacking the necessary funds to complete a project in a timely manner. When such issues present themselves, a good line of communication can often be a remedy to what might otherwise become a volatile situation. No one want to be considered at fault when they in fact had no control over certain events, but this often happens when one hand doesn’t know what the other hand is doing.

How conflicts expose flaws in the management process

When conflict between the owner versus either the contractor or architect exists, this is the type of situation that can ultimately affect project delivery. The alternative is construction manager at risk (CMR), a delivery method that is designed to align designer and builder to collaboratively serve the owner’s best interests.

With construction manager at risk, a contractor is under contract by the owner during the entire design process to assist in pre-construction project management services and then also to act as a general contractor during the construction process. The architect is on a separate, parallel contract with the owner, making sure that the product fits within any predetermined specifications.

In summary, the contractor is responsible for the execution and control of the work and subcontractors are bound by subcontracts to them. Examples of construction manager at risk would include performance and financial stability of subcontractors and vendors, fluctuations in material prices, schedule adherence, weather, construction means and materials, quality and other non-reimbursable general contractor delays. For questions and concerns, speak to an agent familiar with the inner workings of the construction industry.